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The 42 Gates of Masjid Al Nabawi: Discover the Divine Doorways

Travel and PlacesThe 42 Gates of Masjid Al Nabawi: Discover the Divine Doorways

At present, there are 42 gates in Masjid al Nabawi. These entrances provide access to both men and women, making it easy for the crowds to enter the main building complex.

The gates vary in terms of size, age, and function. Some date back to the first Saudi expansion and are now part of the modern structure we see today.

Not everyone is aware that there are so many Masjid al Nabawi gates. Read on to learn more about each of these gates and some of their features:

Gates for Men and Women

Gates for Men Only

Certain Masjid al Nabawi gates are reserved for men. These are: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41

Gates for Women Only

There are fewer Masjid al Nabawi gates reserved for women only. These are 12, 13, 14, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30. 

Masjid al Nabawi Gates: Navigating Tradition and Convenience

Bab as-Salam(Gate no. 1)

Bab as-Salam(Gate no. 1)

The name means ‘the gate of peace’; this is the largest and most decorated of the Masjid al Nabawi gates. During the mosque extensions, Bab as-Salam was moved within its original line to a more westward location. 

Bab-i abu Bakr Siddique (Gate no. 2)

Bab-i abu Bakr Siddique (Gate no. 2)

The Gate of Abu Bakr is built northwards and is situated next to the Bab as-Salam. Another name for it is the “Khukha Abi Bakr,” signaling that it was initially a smaller door. 

Bab ur Rehmah (Gate no. 3)

Bab ur Rehmah (Gate no. 3)

This is among the three oldest Masjid al Nabawi gates installed by the Prophet Muhammad (SWS) during his lifetime. It was also called ‘Bab-e-Atika,’ being originally built in front of ‘Atika bint’ Abdullah bin Yazeed’s home. 

Bab Hijrah(Gate no. 4)

Bab Hijrah(Gate no. 4)

Built-in 1985 CE, this is named the ‘Gate of Migration’. It’s a twin arched gate in the southern wall, made during the Second Saudi Expansion of Masjid al Nabawi. The name was in memory of the Hijrah from Makkah to Medina in 622 CE.